WHEN YOU ARE A SENATOR, YOU SHOULD ACT LIKE ONE

Senator Marco Rubio is salty at Salt Bae.

In case you have no idea what that means, Salt Bae is a chef famous on social media.

Senator Rubio got upset because the social media star made a fancy dinner for Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro while Maduro’s constituents in Venezuela are starving.

Rubio then decided to take to social media and dox Salt Bae — meaning he gave away the location and phone number of the restaurant the social media star owns where he was hosting Maduro — a move that has been roundly criticized by both the left and right.

Let me first say this: I think Salt Bae hosting Maduro and calling it the experience of a lifetime is sickening.

Maduro is a monstrous dictator who feasts while the people in his country suffer at an unthinkable level.

That said, a United States Senator posting that information on social media and essentially egging his followers on to call or otherwise bother Salt Bae is a bridge way too far.

I presume Rubio did not like it when his colleague Mitch McConnell and others were publicly harassed by zealous left-wing activists, even when they were just trying to do simple things like have dinner at a restaurant.

What Rubio did here was no different, and being that he is a sitting United States Senator rather than some no-name activist, he should be ashamed of himself and really ought to know better.

Don’t get me wrong, from a political standpoint, I get it.

Senator Rubio represents a growing number of former Venezuelans who despise Maduro so much that many of them would probably prefer it is the United States intervened in Venezuela.

And I certainly sympathize with their anger, because Maduro’s actions in Venezuela have been unconscionable.

However, what Rubio did was not only wrong, it was dangerous.

The issue of Venezuela is a hot button topic right now and riling millions of people up like this on social media is the type of action that can have very nasty consequences.

I am not saying somebody who read that tweet could get violent, but I am saying these are the kind of tweets that are the most likely ones to lead to something like that.

Senator Rubio has every right to be disgusted with Salt Bae, and so does everybody else.

But the action the Senator took in response should never have happened.

It was a mistake, and I truly hope he realizes it, deletes the tweet, apologizes, and never does anything like it again.

The current climate is polarized enough.

We do not need Senator Rubio muddying the waters even further.

STILL A SORE LOSER TWO YEARS LATER

I hate to break it to some people who just do not want to accept reality, but Hillary Clinton lost to Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

In the aftermath, Clinton has managed to blame the following for her defeat: Russians, Wikileaks, the FBI, Macedonian teenagers, Facebook, racism, sexism, husbands forcing their wives to vote how they want them to, etc…..

You may notice how you do not see the name Hillary Clinton on that list, but I digress.

Recently, Clinton made push to blame the electoral college, because as you may have heard by now, she won the popular vote but Donald Trump won the electoral college and thus won the presidency.

For those still harping on this, let’s state the obvious: the rules and parameters of the election were known well ahead of time.

It was not a secret that the electoral votes of states get a president elected, not the overall popular vote.

I am also 100% positive we would not be hearing about this from Clinton or any of her supporters if she had won in the exact same way President Trump did, but I digress again.

The electoral college gives a voice to the minority, or in other words, ensures that people in all 50 states have to be reckoned with and their concerns listened to, rather than this happening in just a few elite areas.

The founders wanted states to be laboratories of democracy, and to have different identities.

The electoral college system preserves that.

I have heard that argument that currently, all that matters are a handful of swing states since most states are solidly red or blue.

There is some truth to that.

However, the problem is, if you abolish the electoral college system, then all you have to do is win a few populous cities and you can ignore the rest of the country.

That is the exact opposite of how our country is supposed to operate.

Manhattan, Los Angeles, and Chicago were never meant to be the only places worth campaigning and the only real arbiters of who occupies the White House.

Of course, those are all major Democrat strongholds now, so you can see why Hillary Clinton and her supporters would love it if those cities controlled every presidential election from here on out.

We hear the left talk about disenfranchisement all the time, but that is exactly what we would be doing to the middle of the country if we were to abolish the electoral college.

We would be taking away any voice they had and ensuring everything was decided by a few elite cities.

Exactly what the system was designed to protect against.

But then again, Hillary Clinton does not care about any of that.

All Clinton cares about is grabbing power for herself and those around her, so it is not a mystery why she would be in favor of this.

And it is exactly why we should not let it happen.

SCOTT PROVIDING STRONG LEADERSHIP AT FOX

In the wake of the scandals at Fox — especially the ones involving longtime CEO Roger Ailes and 8PM host Bill O’Reilly — there were a lot of questions as to how the network would do going forward.

Some thought Fox was in dire straits, and short of a miracle worker coming in to take over for Ailes, the network could face a steep decline.

But then that miracle worker arrived in the form of somebody who had been there all along.

Suzanne Scott joined Fox News back at the very beginning 22 years ago.

Since then, she rose all the way up to head of programming where she was the driving force behind many key decisions, including putting both Tucker Carlson and Laura Ingraham in primetime, two moves that have proven to be very shrewd.

The move to promote Scott occurred earlier this year and has paid dividends ever since.

If you think about it, her success, while surprising on one level considering the scandals she inherited, is also to be expected in some ways given her history and knowledge of the company.

Think about it: Who knows the on-air personalities better than the woman who was so instrumental in giving them their shows and helping to shape said shows?

And who knows the Fox News audience better than the woman who was primarily responsible for catering to their needs for such a long period of time?

While I have not had the pleasure of meeting Ms. Scott personally, I do travel in a lot of the same circles and have heard great things about how intelligent and savvy she is.

Another point of pride: Mrs. Scott is a fellow New Jersey resident and actually lives in Morristown, one of my favorite places in the state and somewhere I travel to often since I am an active member of the Morristown Club.

Hopefully I cross paths with Mrs. Scott soon so I can let her know what a fine job I think she is doing and what an inspiration she is to young women everywhere.

My three daughters are all successful professionals and all three look up to women like Mrs. Scott who set a terrific example for the type of accomplishments an ambitious woman should strive for in whatever her chosen field is.

Even more so than my daughters, though, women in broadcasting have somebody they can look to as a measuring stick for achievement in the industry and a person they can admire and attempt to emulate.

After 22 years of playing a key role shaping a tremendously successful network, she looks to have many years of continuing her trailblazing work ahead of her.

I am thrilled for her and excited to watch what she will do in the decade ahead in the professional position she seems to have been destined to fill and succeed in.

PRAY FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY HURRICANE FLORENCE

A devastating Hurricane known as “Florence” is in the process of sweeping through the Carolinas, resulting in numerous injuries and casualties, with a reported 12 dead from early estimates in North Carolina alone.

The governors of North and South Carolina surely have their hands full and I am praying for both of them.

I am also, it should go without saying, praying for everybody caught up in this hurricane.

I have already seen a number of high profile people already attempting to make political hay out of this involving President Trump’s response with some criticizing him heavily for not appearing to care enough.

I cannot believe I even have to say this, but people are in serious danger.

This is no time to get needlessly political.

President Trump will be in contact with the governors involved and they will handle everything the best they can.

Instead of using this as another opportunity to try and bash the president, I’d suggest your energy would be better spent sending positive energy towards those affected and donating money to help them repair the eventual wreckage.

Now is no time for politics and I really wish more people saw how obvious that is.

Godspeed to those caught in Florence’s wrath.

I’ll be praying for you and I hope everybody else is, too.

NIKKI HALEY THE VICTIM OF A SMEAR CAMPAIGN AS THE MEDIA ONCE AGAIN LOSE TRUST

I have to hand it to all the people who passed around the “story” that over $50,000 was spent on curtains for the office of U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley.

The story was powerful and seemed to show an example of one of the worst kinds of abuse of unnecessary expenditures for a public servant on the taxpayer’s dime.

The story was initially reported by the New York Times and spread through social media like wildfire, with all the usual “Resistance” types losing their minds as if they had caught a murderer in the act of killing one of his victims.

But also numerous reputable and well-known journalists jumped in on social media to help spread the outrage.

Only problem is, the story was not true.

According to the actual report in question, these curtains were decided upon in 2016, before President Trump took office and well before Nikki Haley began in her current post.

Once this started being pointed out, people started to backtrack and make excuses for the NY Times, saying that at least the Times later made a correction and this was proof they are a responsible journalistic outfit.

Yeah…..oooook.

In their rush to jump to the NY Times’ defense, many of these mainstream journalists completely ignored the obvious, which is that the story had been reported in a certain way and passed around on social media focusing on the fraudulent point about Haley for a reason.

It was done in an attempt to make Nikki Haley — and by extension President Trump — look like corrupt bureaucrats that had fleeced the taxpayers for their own personal gain.

Unfortunately, we have seen many similar cases during the Trump presidency.

For example, the recent story about the Trump administration’s new program of abusing children based on a story from…..2014 when Barack Obama was president.

Last year, a story circulated that Orrin Hatch had said on the Senate floor that CHIP — the health insurance program for low income children — needed to go because he was tired of funding programs for people who refused to help themselves.

Except as even Ezra Klein of Vox — who is no fan of Republicans — pointed out, Hatch was not talking about CHIP when he made those comments and even said he would see to it that CHIP got funded.

But do not tell that to all the people who made fun of Hatch for disparaging “free loading” children.

There are many more recent examples of this, but you get the point.

I understand we are in an age of social media where everything happens fast.

But when incidents like this happen — repeatedly — it becomes quite obvious what is really going on.

As I said, the social media age has certainly made things worse.

In the old days, a news story would not be instant because you were waiting to air it on the 6PM news, or if you were a newspaper, get it into tomorrow’s edition.

But now? Gotta get it out there first and worry about accuracy later.

Nuance and thorough checking be damned.

Put simply, people need to be better than this.

Incidents like this are what give the president ammo to shout “fake news.”

These kind of major mistakes actively keep that from happening.

We are officially in the National Enquirer era now, where nothing matters except outrage.

Accuracy is irrelevant if a story involves pushing your preferred narrative.

In this case, the curtains were purchased for an exorbitant amount at taxpayer expense, but by pretending the timeline of events was different than it actually was just to drive a narrative they wanted to be true, all that ended up happening was the reporter, newspaper, and other prominent people who were responsible for printing and sharing the story on social media took another hit to their credibility.

Job well done. Take a bow, guys.

The fact is, anti-Trump hysteria is very real and it extends far past left-wing activist groups and active democrat party circles.

It has engulfed numerous members of the mainstream media and prominent personalities who willfully play into the hysteria while seeming to care more about clicks than careful reporting both because it drives their own numbers and because — whether they want to admit it or not — they absolutely despise President Trump.

Unless media members think spreading news around that is not true and hurting their credibility just to get the “scoop” and attempt to damage the president is more important than maintaining long-term trust with the public.

Because if that is how they feel, then they should just go on doing what they are doing and expose themselves as frauds even further.

A ROYAL GREEK WEDDING

Normally, I use this space to talk about important world leaders and major world events.

But today, I would like to take a break from that and discuss something that I will always remember, and to me, is just as important as any world leader or major event ever could be.

Dr. John Kallis is one of my dear friends and one of the most kind and generous people you will ever meet.

I have known him and his family for many years and you could not ask for a better friend, doctor, or associate of any kind.

His daughter Michelle — who is an MD with a residence at a prestigious hospital — just got married, so as you can probably imagine, Dr. Kallis is over the moon.

I was honored to be in attendance at St. John The Theologian | The Greek Orthodox Metropolitan Cathedral, one of the most culturally rich and architecturally gorgeous houses of worship that I have ever visited.

I found the ceremony to be one of the most beautiful celebrations that I have ever witnessed.

I was so overjoyed to be a part of this and see the jubilation of Dr. Kallis and his family that I was inspired to write an article about the occasion and I have decided to share it with you here.

Congratulations to Dr. Kallis, his lovely daughter Michelle, and their entire family.

It is very uncommon in today’s world that two young people meeting each other and deciding to get married would be considered anything traditional.

In certain religious and ethnic groups, centuries of wedding and marriage traditions vibrantly continue as is true with many Jewish, Indian and Greek wedding ceremonies.

Yet, such was the case with two young, energetic Greek-American professionals who had the wedding of the century this past weekend at The Pierre Hotel on Fifth Ave and Central Park in New York City in front 450 guests.

Michelle and Loukas have known each other since before they were born, as their great grandparents, grandparents and parents come from the same small village in Central Greece near the mythological ancient city of Thebes.

As thousands of years have gone by, it was their destiny to meet as children at Greek ethnic events, to go to the senior prom together as friends out of respect for their families’ traditions, and to eventually meet each other in Hoboken, NJ one night while out with a large group of other young Greek-Americans.

It was also their destiny to fall in love, nurture their relationship, and develop it along traditional and cultural standards.

The way that Loukas asked Michelle’s mother and father for their daughter’s hand in marriage…….

The traditional Greek engagement party where there is an exchange of gifts to the young couple from the families……

The planning of “The Big Fat Greek Royal Wedding” where there is traditional Greek music (with clarinets, bouzouki, violins and drums), wonderful and festive Greek dancing…..

The traditional breaking of dishes and throwing money, which is done to bring good luck/fortune to the newlyweds and to scare away the negative…….

All of these things spoke to both the incredible nature of the moment and the beauty of preserving cultural traditions that have been passed along from generation to generation for centuries.

As a close personal friend of Michelle’s father, I could not be happier or more proud to see his daughter this radiant and am thrilled they have welcomed Loukas and his family into the Kallis family — one of the most revered families in the entire tri-state area — with open arms.

September 2, 2018 was an unbelievable wedding and the most amazing way possible for Loukas and Michelle to officially start their lives together.

May they always remember that day fondly and may they have a lifetime of happiness and wedded bliss.

MOLLIE TIBBETTS CASE ONLY SHOWCASES ONE PART OF THE IMMIGRATION PROBLEM IN THE UNITED STATES

Mollie Tibbetts is dead and the man who killed her, Cristhian Bahena Rivera, was arrested wees ago.

In case you are unfamiliar with what happened, Rivera was in the United States illegally and reportedly harassed the late Ms. Tibbetts repeatedly before the murder.

In fact, Rivera had reportedly harassed multiple women in the same Iowa town.

If Rivera had been picked up for this harassment and deported once discovered to have been living in the country illegally, Mollie Tibbetts would still be alive.

That said, right off the bat, let me say that this does not mean that all immigrants here illegally are likely to commit crimes.

But it does mean that when one such immigrant has repeatedly harassed women, local authorities should be willing to work with the feds to ensure that he is removed as quickly as possible and punished harshly if he tries to return.

The problem in America right now, though, is that we cannot even suggest this as a possibility without somebody hollering “racist!” or “bigot!” I do not see the desire to enforce our immigration laws as racist.

As somebody who came to this country many years ago as an immigrant from Pakistan, I know better than anybody the incredible opportunities America can offer. I came here with nothing and I was able to become a very successful doctor and live an amazing life.

But I came here legally and did everything the right way.

And while I sympathize with those who are undocumented — whether they snuck in unlawfully or just overstayed their visas — there is a reason why countries need to have at least some control of their borders.

As much as I want to see as many people as possible come here from other countries and do well, when somebody comes here illegally, there are people who suffer as a result, and not only in the way Kate Steinle did. For starters, there are those who wait in line for legal citizenship only to be bypassed and essentially punished for following the law.

But there are also negative consequences for some American workers, especially those who are most in need. As both Senator Bernie Sanders and President Trump pointed out during the 2016 campaign, there are millions of Americans who are suffering.

Unskilled laborers haven’t had a significant raise in wages in many years and quite a few of them struggle to find or keep steady employment. When an undocumented immigrant enters the labor force, this drives down wages for those aforementioned unskilled laborers, because employers would prefer to pay those immigrants the artificially low wages that are far below what an American citizen may accept under the minimum wage laws.

Furthermore, the market becomes flooded with a much greater supply of this cheap, unskilled labor, and fewer jobs exist for working class Americans.

Don’t get me wrong, I am NOT blaming these immigrants. It is still better for them to make the low wages in this country than it would be to have stayed in their home countries and worked. They are doing what they feel is best for them.

But it comes at a cost to many working-class American citizens.

Perhaps the answer is to truly reform our immigration system and find ways to let more people in than we currently do. Maybe we can more effectively screen people so that we can try our best to avoid these problems.

However, we do need safeguards and we do need to address the issue.

And we cannot continue to act as if anybody who even dares to speak about it is some unconscionable monster.

President Trump was elected in part because he showed a desire to tackle the immigration issue, something both parties in Washington have talked about, but failed to do for decades.

Mollie Tibbetts’ death is the worst case scenario.

But everybody needs to stop ignoring the larger, more common problems.

Complete inaction is no longer good enough.

For the good of the nation, I hope we can all come together and try to really fix this problem.

MACDONALD DOES NOT DESERVE THIS LEVEL OF ANGER

Recently, comedian Norm Macdonald was bumped from an upcoming appearance on the Tonight Show” with Jimmy Fallon after he made some comments in a recent interview that some found upsetting.

Here are the portions that got the negative attention:

“I’m happy the #MeToo movement has slowed down a little bit. It used to be, ‘One hundred women can’t be lying.’ And then it became, ‘One woman can’t lie.’ And that became, ‘I believe all women.’ And then you’re like, ‘What?’ Like, that Chris Hardwick guy I really thought got the blunt end of the stick there.”

He then added, referring to Roseanne Barr and Louis CK (two personal friends of his):

“There are very few people that have gone through what they have, losing everything in a day,” Macdonald said. “Of course, people will go, ‘What about the victims?’ But you know what? The victims didn’t have to go through that.”

The first part I have no issue with as I completely understand what Macdonald meant.

Agree or don’t, he is not alone in his fear that #Metoo has gotten to the point where now a simple accusation can ruin a person before anybody even looks into the allegations.

As far as the second part, I understand what he means about Barr and CK and he is obviously trying to defend his friends, which is a normal human instinct.

However, the last part of the sentence, where he minimized what the victims went through, that came off as cold and detached to say the least.

That said, sometimes people say the wrong thing when they are speaking off the cuff in an interview.

Macdonald apologized in the aftermath, but that was not good enough for the outrage mob, who yelled and screamed until Fallon pathetically wilted under the pressure and cancelled the comedian’s upcoming appearance.

Unfortunately, this is nothing new and the anger from the social justice crowd only seems to go in one direction.

Recently, comedian Samantha Bee recently faced crticism for calling President Trump’s daughter Ivanka a “feckless c — t”

That is perfectly fine.

A good comedian is supposed to go after those in power.

Though if Bee assuredly would have been suspended or fired if the circumstances had been different.

In other words, Bee’s vitriol is only aimed in the direction of those on the opposite side of her politically and the targets of her ire are the “socially acceptable” ones.

Now, again, that is not a big deal.

But let’s just imagine for a second that a right-leaning entertainer called Chelsea Clinton a “feckless c — t.”

He or she would have been immediately annihilated by the press and relieved of duties as a television host.

Yet, most in the press corps stood by and said nothing when Bee said this about Ivanka Trump.

To her credit, Ivanka Trump took the high road.

Sadly, Macdonald’s detractors did not and instead demanded action.

But does there really need to be action taken in a case like this?

Many are calling on Netflix to remove Macdonald’s show from its service, but this is a very dangerous road to go down.

We have seen this tactic used by the left, time and time again, most recently against Laura Ingraham.

It was shameless bullying then, and it is shameless bullying now.

If you do not like Samantha Bee or Norm Macdonald say, do not watch their shows.

If you do not like jokes made by a Hollywood star or musician, do not feel obligated to pay for the material they produce.

But when you start organizing boycotts to try to ruin somebody for saying something you do not like, that is a slippery slope.

Because the outrage mob is great when you are on the right side of it, but you could be leading it today only to be destroyed by it tomorrow.

If you do not believe me, just ask Samantha Bee, Sarah Silverman, Michael Ian Black, and James Gunn, all of whom were members of the mob at one point until the mob turned against them.

I just hope now that sometime soon, people seriously start to think twice about trying to sick these mobs on somebody else the next time comments are said that offend their sensibilities.

But I would be lying if I said I was not afraid that this is only going to get much, much worse in the near future.

MORNING SCHMO: MSNBC HOST REACHES NEW LOW

Just when I think Joe Scarborough cannot become any more pathetic than he already is, he somehow goes ahead and tops himself.

Congratulations, I guess?

Though to be fair, pathetic is far too kind of a word for the miserably sad human being Scarborough has become during the Trump presidency.

His latest?

An op-ed in the Washington Post in which he actually had so little shame that he found it within himself to argue that Donald Trump being president is worse than the 9/11 attacks — on the anniversary of 9/11, no less.

“The question for voters this fall is whether their country will move beyond this troubled chapter in history or whether they will continue supporting a politician who has done more damage to the dream of America than any foreign adversary ever could,” wrote the embarrassment of a television host and ex-Congressman.

Classy stuff, Joe.

Of course, Scarborough can stake out ground as a so-called important voice in the #Resistance, but he was singing quite a different tune a few years ago.

In fact, lets be honest, he basically spent two full years kissing the president’s rear end during the lead up to the election.

He can continue to deny it, but as the saying in sports goes, “film don’t lie.”

I am a supporter of President Trump, but even I had to laugh at the ridiculously favorable coverage Scarborough gave the man.

From a CNN article in February 2016:

In background discussions, NBC News and MSNBC journalists, reporters and staffers said there was widespread discomfort at the network over Scarborough’s friendship with Trump and his increasingly favorable coverage of the candidate.

“People don’t like that Joe is promoting Trump,” one MSNBC insider said. Others described Scarborough’s admiration for Trump as “over the top” and “unseemly.”

Both Scarborough and co-host Mika Brzezinski are close friends with Trump and members of his family. Scarborough, a former four-term congressman from Florida’s 1st district, has often stayed at Trump’s Mar-A-Lago Club, in Palm Beach, Florida, with his family and was there during the week between Christmas and New Year’s, two sources at the hotel during that time said.

On the night of the New Hampshire primary, Scarborough and Brzezinski visited Trump’s hotel room for what MSNBC described as background discussions with the candidate’s senior staff and a conversation with Trump that “lasted less than five minutes.”

In recent weeks, Scarborough has spoken about Trump in increasingly glowing terms, praising him as “a masterful politician” and defending him against his political opponents and media critics. The Washington Post has noted that Trump has received “a tremendous degree of warmth from the show,” and that his appearances on the show, in person and over the phone, often feel like “a cozy social club.”

Scarborough has always been opinionated and outspoken, and he has never made any secret about his political opinions. Nevertheless, some of his colleagues believe that his coverage is influenced by his friendship.

Some MSNBC insiders also cringed at an on-air exchange Scarborough had last month with radio host Hugh Hewitt, who pressed Scarborough on whether he would serve as Trump’s vice president. Scarborough ruled out the possibility but not before saying he would do “just about anything to try to get the White House back.”

Trump, meanwhile, has also spoken in glowing terms about Scarborough.

“He’s a great guy, and he has a great show … and we have a lot of fun,” Trump told Howie Carr, the Boston talk radio show host, in January. “Joe’s doing well. You know, he’s making money for the first time in his life, really making some pretty good money.”

After the last Republican primary debate, on February 6, Trump was asked by a reporter how he thought the debate had gone. His response: “I think I did very well. I mean, Joe Scarborough and everyone is tweeting.”

But the most notable acknowledgment of Trump and Scarborough’s relationship came on the morning after Trump’s victory in the New Hampshire primary. In an interview with “Morning Joe,” the GOP frontrunner told Scarborough and Brzezinski: “You guys have been supporters, and I really appreciate it.”

The remark, which Trump sought to clarify — “not necessarily supporters, but at least believers” — sparked a hurried attempt by Scarborough and Brzezinski to dismiss the perception that they were pro-Trump.

“When you say supporter, you’re obviously talking about how actually … there were a handful of people who for six months have been saying what happened last night could happen and the rest of the media world has been mocking and ridiculing exactly what he’s done,” Scarborough said.

After Trump hung up, Scarborough sought to clarify the matter further: “Donald said support. It’s not support … and I would dare say that I am the only person who has hung up on Donald Trump on live television. And the thing is we’ve been very critical of his approach toward Muslims, we said he went too far on John McCain, we said he went too far on you name it,” he said.”

Then at some point, Scarborough decided the president was a bad guy, despite treating him like Winston Churchill for two years.

Was it because of policy differences?

Na.

It was because the president mocked Scarborough’s fiance and co-host Mika Brzezinski.

So now Scarborough spends his time on his unwatchable morning show trashing the president for positions he always agreed with but now disagrees with merely to spite his new enemy, and recording anti-Trump songs that are so unbearably terrible not even Mika could have told him was good with a straight face.

If you have been watching this ridiculous sham play out in real time and thrown up in your mouth as a result, I could hardly blame you.

The truth is that Joe Scarborough does not care about the president’s policies.

No matter how mad he portrays himself to be, his act is as transparent as a screen door that was just doused in Windex.

Scarborough can claim he is “standing up for women,” or call the president a “tyrant,” but in reality, the former congressman is nothing more than a sad huckster trying to play white knight to his on-air sidekick girlfriend.

And now he has taken it to the level of shamelessly using the anniversary of 9/11 to try and slime a president he has a personal vendetta against.

As President Trump himself would say: Sad!

If you enjoy Scarborough’s tirades directed at President Trump because you hate the president THAT much, it is a free country, you are entitled to think whatever you want about Scarborough’s “righteous anger.”

Just as long as you understand that is not “righteous” at all.

In fact, it is not even real.

REMEMBERING 9/11 AND TRYING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.

9/11 changed everything.

They say “Never Forget” 9/11 and I know I certainly won’t.

It was the worst attack ever carried out on U.S. soil and it hit home very hard for me, since I was in New Jersey at the time and a significant number of victims on 9/11 were from my home state.

My heart still weeps uncontrollably for the men and women who died that day, all of whom went about their normal business thinking they would see a tomorrow that never came.

I remember specifically reading about victims of the attack in over 90 countries, including Pakistan where I was born.

I also read quite a bit about several Pakistani Americans who perished in New York City that day.

All of that inspired me to try to make a difference in the wake of 9/11, so I decided to start the AISS Foundation, which would be dedicated to providing a first class education for children born in my birth country.

But not just children from elite backgrounds, children from ALL backgrounds.

Including and especially poor children who desperately need educational opportunities to advance in life.

Since then, with the help of General Bajwa and the terrific Pakistani military, and the government, currently run by the amazing Imran Khan, the AISS Foundation is in its second decade of helping children succeed and advance in heir lives through the power of education.

On this, the 17th anniversary of 9/11, I urge you to do something similar.

You do not necessarily have to start your own foundation, but contribute to somebody else’s.

Find a cause worth supporting and lend them your time and money.

Honor those who tragically perished on 9/11 by working to improve the lives of those who need you now.

Never forget those who have been lost, and always remember to take of the ones that are still here.